Fall Hunts

September 23, 2017

Maybe Facebook isn’t your thing (too many cute puppies and baby pictures) but it seems my friends in Alaska are posting lots of wildlife: dead or alive.

While fall can mean the changing of seasons, and time to hurry and wrap up all those things on the to-do list you’ve been putting off, for some, there is a different call of the wild:  the hunt.

Yes, it is hunting season. One of my North Slope guests was sharing with me the good news that her village had just harvested their first whale for the season. This apparently is great reason for rejoicing in the village as it will be shared by all.   Some other guests hire guides to take them out to parts unknown to see their trophy.  My brother-in-law posted “Clear Creek or bust” on his facebook page before heading north to Fairbanks to hunt a moose. And even my newest niece posted her “prize” catch of a moose.

moose pic

First moose

My husband isn’t fond of hunting for moose, but he made two trips to Chitina to try to catch some red salmon.  Two trips, because the first was a total bust:  he and a couple of fellow employees got skunked and came back empty handed.  (Water was too high, they claimed.)  The second time was slightly more successful with a few fish, but he certainly didn’t limit out.  Wouldn’t you know, a cheechako friend (that’s Alaskan for a newcomer) just posted on FB today that he and a couple other guys netted (no pun intended) 60 red salmon!

Moose crossing road

Fall moose crossing road

Then there are those who post other kinds of pictures of wildlife, like my brother; a picture of “traffic”–a moose crossing the road on the way to work.  Or the same niece with pictures of dahl sheep in Denali Park.  Fall is holding on tenaciously–fortunately for those who hunt.  And those of us who procrastinate.  Beautiful yellows on the birch trees that line the roadways.  We are enjoying no frost here yet; very unusual for the third week in September, as we usually experience frost by the Equinox run.

H  auling equipment

U  nknown parts

N   ot knowing what

T   rials and tribulations await

 

 

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What is “Alaska” to you?

February 27, 2017

Ice, snow, dogs, aurora, snowmachines, moose?

What words does your mind conjure up when some says “Alaska”?

Well, they are all here, all right now!

For the next month, the International Ice Carving Competition is in full swing—starting with small blocks (think six feet by four feet), and ramping up to twenty plus feet of carefully sculpted displays with intricate detail.  Take a complimentary loaner sled to enjoy the ice slide, and be sure to take your camera! 

Ice carving of chair and polar bear

Picture yourself here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dog team with musher at finish line

dog team enjoying salmon break

 

 

Next week we are privileged in Fairbanks to host the beginning of the Iditarod. It’s normal starting point is from Anchorage; however, due to a lack of snow fall along the course (not so sure that is true due to the latest snowstorms) Fairbanks will be watching the start-up on Monday March 6th.

While this week the activity levels have been fairly good for aurora viewing, the cloudy skies have prevented clear view of the northern light.  Keep informed by checking the predictions at www.gi.alaska.edu/AuroraForecast.

Yesterday the town was packed for people to see the finish of the Iron Dog snowmachine race.  Several of our guests were here to pick up their friends and family or simply view the event. 

Today is ideal weather for building a snowman.  Frankly, the snow here in Fairbanks is normally very dry and “crunchy.”  You have heard that one of the indigenous languages here in Alaska has perhaps 50 words for snow?  Well, today’s snow is heavy, wet and perfect for that snowman if you happen to feel up to that.  As the snow gets deeper, moose come closer into town to graze on vegetation that is easier to reach.  I happened upon these moose a couple days ago in our neighborhood.

Two moose wandering through the neighborhood

Moose meandering the neighborhood

What adventure draws you to the frozen North this time of year?  We are ready and waiting for your arrival. 


Plan that Trip North (Part 1)

January 21, 2016
northern lights above roof tops

circles of light

What should you know about traveling to Fairbanks in the winter months?

Believe it or not, March has become one of the busiest months in the year.  People from all around the world come to enjoy a wide variety of specialty winter activities:  our international ice carving competition, the northern lights, and several dog mushing competitions.

ice sculpture

Ice art competition

But you say how can I be warm then?  Not to worry.  While it seems that you might freeze in the winter months, most people come with a typical winter coat and prepare to dress with layers–long underwear, a warm long-sleeved shirt, a sweater or fleece layer and then the coat.  Similar guidelines follow for the lower body; long underwear, pants, and perhaps snow pants.  Warm boots are a good idea, particularly if you plan to stay outside and walk around the ice park, or wander outside and wait for the aurora to appear.

What about getting around?  We always recommend renting a car, because while Fairbanks is small, you will find you really won’t be able to walk around to visit the places you want to go or restaurants where you want to eat. Road conditions, generally speaking, are no worse than other places that get snow, and frankly, they may seem quite a bit better due to staying frozen or even showing bare pavement.  There is a public bus system that you may find helpful if you choose to not rent a vehicle.

What’s open then, you ask.  Lots!  You will want to visit the Morris Thompson Cultural Center, as well as the University of Alaska Fairbanks.  We have an amazing amount of talent in Fairbanks, which results in plenty of options for theatrical and music productions, and art displays.  Consider heading to one of the local coffee shops where you’ll find a wide array of local talent, happy to entertain you in just about any genre you could imagine.    Special events abound: dog sled races, concerts, downhill and cross country skiing.

What are you waiting for?  Time to get started on planning your visit–summer or winter!

 

 


March Moose and Other Wild Things

March 12, 2015

Now that the trails are filled with Iditarod mushers on the way to Nome, and the Great North American is just around the corner, Alaskans reach with gusto to enjoy the final stretch of winter.

sled dogs

Sled dogs anxious to run

With all the great races in March, there are additional attractions on the more leisurely side. In this case, the occasional meandering moose that wander through the neighborhood, or even stop on the street to munch on branches.

Backyard moose

Backyard moose

How about great sunrises and sunsets?

Crisp and clear sunrise

Crystal clear sunrise

Better yet, many visitors set their sights on the northern lights.

Aurora Glow

Northern lights above the arches

Whichever kind of activity you choose this month, they are all here in our backyard, waiting for your visit.

And while it may be cold right now, we offer a warm welcome to you as you come to enjoy our wild, and not so wild attractions.