What is “Alaska” to you?

February 27, 2017

Ice, snow, dogs, aurora, snowmachines, moose?

What words does your mind conjure up when some says “Alaska”?

Well, they are all here, all right now!

For the next month, the International Ice Carving Competition is in full swing—starting with small blocks (think six feet by four feet), and ramping up to twenty plus feet of carefully sculpted displays with intricate detail.  Take a complimentary loaner sled to enjoy the ice slide, and be sure to take your camera! 

Ice carving of chair and polar bear

Picture yourself here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dog team with musher at finish line

dog team enjoying salmon break

 

 

Next week we are privileged in Fairbanks to host the beginning of the Iditarod. It’s normal starting point is from Anchorage; however, due to a lack of snow fall along the course (not so sure that is true due to the latest snowstorms) Fairbanks will be watching the start-up on Monday March 6th.

While this week the activity levels have been fairly good for aurora viewing, the cloudy skies have prevented clear view of the northern light.  Keep informed by checking the predictions at www.gi.alaska.edu/AuroraForecast.

Yesterday the town was packed for people to see the finish of the Iron Dog snowmachine race.  Several of our guests were here to pick up their friends and family or simply view the event. 

Today is ideal weather for building a snowman.  Frankly, the snow here in Fairbanks is normally very dry and “crunchy.”  You have heard that one of the indigenous languages here in Alaska has perhaps 50 words for snow?  Well, today’s snow is heavy, wet and perfect for that snowman if you happen to feel up to that.  As the snow gets deeper, moose come closer into town to graze on vegetation that is easier to reach.  I happened upon these moose a couple days ago in our neighborhood.

Two moose wandering through the neighborhood

Moose meandering the neighborhood

What adventure draws you to the frozen North this time of year?  We are ready and waiting for your arrival. 


March Moose and Other Wild Things

March 12, 2015

Now that the trails are filled with Iditarod mushers on the way to Nome, and the Great North American is just around the corner, Alaskans reach with gusto to enjoy the final stretch of winter.

sled dogs

Sled dogs anxious to run

With all the great races in March, there are additional attractions on the more leisurely side. In this case, the occasional meandering moose that wander through the neighborhood, or even stop on the street to munch on branches.

Backyard moose

Backyard moose

How about great sunrises and sunsets?

Crisp and clear sunrise

Crystal clear sunrise

Better yet, many visitors set their sights on the northern lights.

Aurora Glow

Northern lights above the arches

Whichever kind of activity you choose this month, they are all here in our backyard, waiting for your visit.

And while it may be cold right now, we offer a warm welcome to you as you come to enjoy our wild, and not so wild attractions.


Bragging Rights

February 3, 2015
fog on the road

Haze of ice fog on the Johansen on the way to town

Alaskans in general seem to enjoy their bragging rights. Consider the fact that when Alaska is superimposed over the “lower ’48” one end of the Aleutian Islands to the southern eastern coast it spans the entire United States. We’ll bypass those slogans that circulated in pipeline days regarding Texans and Oklahoma and suffice it to say that Alaska is BIG.

We do things in a big way up here. This last year was a prime example. If we are going have rain, we are going to do it big, have rain the entire summer,  and beat out all previous records. It seems God smiled on us after that and gave us a record warm winter–at least until last week.

If we must brag, it could be about anything. Vegetables? We grow them big, and in just three short months of summer. If it’s a dog sled race, we don’t mess around–it’s a thousand miles, through vast stretches of wilderness and bone-chilling temperatures. Then there are the unique benefits of living here; I mean, how many other states send a yearly check in the mail to every man, woman and child in the state, just for being a resident?

Today we have completed more than a week with an average temperature of 30 below zero. Somehow, the challenge of keeping the home fires burning, the cars running, and just surviving make us appreciate our home a little bit more when we have a slight warming, and suddenly people are not bundled up with barely a face exposed to the cold, but running into the grocery store with just a fleece jacket and sweats because “it’s warm outside.” My, what a difference 20 degrees makes at this time of year!